Mountaintop Residents Compete In Welsh ‘Cynonfardd’ Eisteddfod

 

Mountaintop  children  and  adults  contributed  to  making  the  124th  “

Cynonfardd”  Eisteddfod  held  at  Dr.  Edwards  Memorial  Congregational  Church

 in  Edwardsville  a  success. Nuangola’s  Sally  Morgan  DiRico  has

 been  a  long-term  supporter  and  organizer  of  the  singing,  piano  and  poetry

 competition,  modeled  after  the  Welsh  National  Eisteddfod,  and  she

 says  that  this  cultural  tradition  is  ancient,  remarking,  “In  Wales,  this  goes  back  to  the  days  of  the  Bards.”

In  this  country,  she  reminds,  124  years  is  still  a  time-honored  event,  one

 that  she  and  her  husband  John,  and  her  parents  before  her,  helped  to

 organize  over  many  years.  “Next  year

 will  be  a  big  one  – the  125th,  that’s  a  big,  big  step.”  She  adds  that  the

 music  festival  at  Dr.  Edwards  Church  missed  only  one  year  of  celebration  of  the  arts,  “There  was  one

 year  during  World  War  II  when  it  was  held  in  abeyance.”

The  event  is  always  held  on  the  last

 Saturday  of  April  and  as  tradition  requires,  the  children  shall  lead  the  way.

 The  youngest  start  at  the  age  of  5  and  the  afternoon  session  allows  for  performers  of   up  to  18  years  of  age.

 “In  the  afternoon  we  have  First,  Second  and  Third  prizes  and  then  we  have

 prizes  for  everybody  else  who  enters.  Every  child  goes  home  with  a

 hand-made  gift  bag  with  some  monetary  prize  in  it.”  The  children  are

 separated  into  four  age  groups  for  the  competitions.

Mountaintop  area  residents  who  participated  in  the  “Cynonfardd”   Eisteddfod

 included  Caroline  Jones  in  the  16-18  age  group  who  performed

 a  vocal  solo,  piano  solo,  and

 Bible  reading;  in  the  13-15  age  category,  Alice  Novatnak  performed  a  solo  and  Andrew  Alday  performed  on

 the  piano.  In  the  5-7  age  category,  Jean

 Bohn  and  Jordan  Ceklosky  competed  in  recitation  and  Sarah  Bohn

 competed  in  recitation  in  the  8  to  10  age  category.

After  a  buffet  dinner,  Sally  says,  “ We  go  into  a  Gymanfa  Ganu,  which  is  a  Welsh  hymn  sing.  And  then  we  start

 the  adult  competition.” The  evening  includes  vocal  performances

 of  solos,  duets,  quartets,  choruses  and  also  recitations.  Each  participant

 is  again  eligible  for  the  First  and  Second  Place  awards.

As  the  Secretary  for  the  day-long  event,  DiRico  is  responsible  for  all  registrations

 and  tracking  the  songs  and  poems  that  participants  will  feature.

 She  said  that  the  entries  number  110  for  this  year,  and  people  come

 from  all  over  to  take  part.  “I  just  got  something  from  a  gentleman  in

 Lancaster,  and  he  can’t  come  this  year,  but  he  sent  me  an  article  from  his

 aunt  who  regularly  attended  that  National  Eisteddfod  in  Wales.  She  said

 in  the  Eisteddfod  in  Wales  in  1955  a  chorus  from  Modena,  Italy  won  First  Prize  and  in  that  chorus  was  Luciano  Pavarotti!”

Dr.  Edwards  brought  the  Eisteddfod  to  America  as  a  way  to  introduce

 the  Welsh  immigrants  to  the  English  language  by  teaching  them

 hymns  and  poetry.  His  mission  here  in  the  U.  S.  evolved  to  launching  the

 Eisteddfod,  Sally  explained.    “It  was  named  ‘Cynonfardd’  after  Dr.  Edwards

 because  he  was  from  the  Cynon  Valley  and  he  won  the  Bardic  Chair

 when  he  performed  in  Wales.” She  admits  that  the  Eisteddfod  makes

 for  a  long,  but  very,  very  satisfying  day  for  herself,  the  other  volunteers  and  the  performers.  But  it

 is  also  one  that  brings  the  arts  into  people’s  lives,  and  keeps  the  rich  and  valued

 history  of  Wales  and  pride  in  the  Welsh  heritage  alive.

 “This  is  my  history  and  it’s  very  important  to  continue  this  within  my  church.

 And  this  is  our  connection  with  Wales.”